email: info@sussexheritage.co.uk
Call us: 01903 413606

 __________________

 

Now taking self-catering group bookings for 2017.

 

See our fantastic new range of heritage holidays.

Overview

Discover how man and nature have interacted over the centuries, exploring the natural sights of Sussex: Pagham Harbour Nature Reserve, the Trundle Iron Age hill fortifications, the stranded beach at Slindon and the ancient yew forest at Kingley Vale.

4 Night Itinerary

Day 1 - Arrive from 4 pm, welcome and introduction

 

Day 2 – Woodland exploration

We start at Kingley Vale, probably one of the finest ancient yew forests still surviving in Europe.  It’s one if the first Nature Conservancy sites created in 1911 and contains a wealth of the world of nature, including woodpeckers, skylarks, owls, pipits, warblers and goldcrests, 39 of the 38 species of English butterflies, and plants of all sorts including wild orchids.  The Trundle hill nearby rises majestically where the coastal plain meets the Downs, giving magnificent views for miles. It was fortified in Iron Age times. With its 2 metre deep ditches, high banks and great wooden gates it dominated the landscape and we have a bracing walk over the tops.

Slindon woods are now protected by the National Trust. Treasure hidden amongst the shady beech trees include an ancient stranded beach, a remnant from the times when the coastline ran here rather than 7 miles south as it does today, 3 miles of Stane Street built by the Romans and the Medieval Pale (deer park boundary). We walk through the woods and explore the village.

 

Day 3 The Sussex Coast

Pagham and Chichester Harbours form one of the few remaining undeveloped coastal area in southern England. The massive stretch of tidal flats and saltings are of outstanding ecological significance. Very large populations of wildfowl and waders use the mudflats, feeding on the rich plant life and huge populations of intertidal invertebrates. It’s an internationally important wetland site for wildlife and more than 50,000 birds reside in or visit the harbours throughout the year.

At Pagham the big, sheltered bay that fills and empties with each tide, with wild ducks, geese and wading birds flighting to and fro. Our walk starts at the RSPB information centre and we walk around the harbour edge to the sea. There is something of interest all year round. Resident species include little egrets, ringed plovers and lapwings.

We visit West Wittering with the magnificent sandy beach and protected headland of East Head, giving expansive views over the Isle of Wight and across to the Downs. A ferry ride takes us across the harbour to Bosham.

 

Day 4 Downland landscapes

Cissbury Ring is an hill of chalk downland fortified in Iron Age times, some 2,300 years ago. Centuries before the hill was fortified stone age people mined flint here using antlers horns for tools dug shafts down some 40 feet with galleries spreading out from them. After a stop at Chanctonbury ring 2 miles further north we move to the river side village of Houghton Bridge and walk in the chalk downland along the River Arun and up into the hills. Either return to the minibus or continue the walk along the river back to Sussex Heritage Centre.

 

Day 5 Departure

Please pack up your room by 11. If you have time you’re welcome to leave your bags and explore further, perhaps using one of our guides to local walks

 

3 Night Itinerary

Day 1 - Arrive from 4 pm, welcome and introduction

 

Day 2 – Downland and Woodland

We start at Kingley Vale, probably one of the finest ancient yew forests still surviving in Europe.  It’s one if the first Nature Conservancy sites created in 1911 and contains a wealth of the world of nature, including woodpeckers, skylarks, owls, pipits, warblers and goldcrests, 39 of the 38 species of English butterflies, and plants of all sorts including wild orchids.  The Trundle hill nearby rises majestically where the coastal plain meets the Downs, giving magnificent views for miles. It was fortified in Iron Age times. With its 2 metre deep ditches, high banks and great wooden gates it dominated the landscape and we have a bracing walk over the tops.

Slindon woods are now protected by the National Trust. Treasure hidden amongst the shady beech trees include an ancient stranded beach, a remnant from the times when the coastline ran here rather than 7 miles south as it does today, 3 miles of Stane Street built by the Romans and the Medieval Pale (deer park boundary). We walk through the woods and explore the village.

 

Day 3 The Sussex Coast

Pagham and Chichester Harbours form one of the few remaining undeveloped coastal area in southern England. The massive stretch of tidal flats and saltings are of outstanding ecological significance. Very large populations of wildfowl and waders use the mudflats, feeding on the rich plant life and huge populations of intertidal invertebrates. It’s an internationally important wetland site for wildlife and more than 50,000 birds reside in or visit the harbours throughout the year.

At Pagham the big, sheltered bay that fills and empties with each tide, with wild ducks, geese and wading birds flighting to and fro. Our walk starts at the RSPB information centre and we walk around the harbour edge to the sea. There is something of interest all year round. Resident species include little egrets, ringed plovers and lapwings.

We visit West Wittering with the magnificent sandy beach and protected headland of East Head, giving expansive views over the Isle of Wight and across to the Downs. A ferry ride takes us across the harbour to Bosham.

 

Day 4 Departure

Please pack up your room by 11. If you have time you’re welcome to leave your bags and explore further, perhaps using one of our guides to local walks

 

Dates, Prices & Online Booking

  4 nights from £375 per person booknow or phone us on 01903 884971 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
        3 nights from £315 per person booknow or phone us on 01903 884971 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.